Pre-PA

Ultimate Physician Assistant Gift Guide - 2018

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Wondering what to get for all of the PAs in your life? Whether Pre-PA, current students, or practicing PAs, we’ve got you covered with this 2018 Holiday Gift Guide. We’ve broken it down by category and you’ll find more practical options to go with some of the more fun choices. Feel free to pass this guide along to your family and friends to give them some hints about what’s on your shopping list. Some of the links in this post are affiliate links, which means we get a small percentage if you make a purchase as no extra cost to you. This list is just in time for Black Friday so make sure to keep your eyes peeled for deals!

To Wear

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Looking professional is a staple as a physician assistant! Medelita is my go-to brand for medical wear in clinic. A gift card will provide a choice between the various scrubs, white coats, or scrub jackets, but I’ll share some of my favorites.

Medelita offers free shipping, the option of embroidery, a 1-year warranty, and at-home try-on. What more could you ask for? I recommend any of the scrubs, and my favorite white coats are the Ellody or the Rebecca. If you’ve never bought anything from Medelita, you can set up a new account and get $20 off your first purchase over $70. Use the code PAPLATFORM1 for a 20% discount.

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If you’re looking for something more casual, check out Medthusiast for the cutest and comfiest T-shirts and sweatshirts. Both Medelita and Medthusiast are companies that were created by PAs, which makes them even cooler!

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To Read

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For the Pre-PA Student - To help future PA students reach their goals, there are some must have resources out there to make the process much easier. The Applicant’s Manual of Physician Assistant Programs provides information about all of the current PA programs. This is a huge time saver because it can be difficult to track down that info. After applying, the interview is the next step, so the Physician Assistant School Interview Guide is a great present for anyone in the application process.

For the current or soon-to-be PA Student - There were 2 books that were extremely helpful to me while I was in PA school - the “green” book and Lange Q&A. I used these the entire time and particularly when studying for boards. I’ve also heard great things about PANCE Prep Pearls.

For anyone and everyone - Dr. Atul Gawande is my favorite non-fiction/medical author. His books should be mandatory reading for anyone in medicine. Better and Complications would be welcome stocking stuffers for any PA!

For School

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While PA school is thankfully a somewhat distant memory for me, there are a few things I couldn’t have survived without.

A great computer. If you really love your PA student (or soon-to-be student), make sure they have a functioning laptop. I’ve heard great things about the iPad Pro and Notability for taking notes, so that’s a good option too. I started school with a MacBook Pro and ended with a Microsoft Surface. I wish I had my Surface at the beginning of my program so I could have taken notes directly on our never ending PowerPoints. I’m back to a MacBook now, but the Surface was great for studying for boards.

A functioning printer. Even though everything is online these days, I’m still a pen and paper type of person at times. I like to write things out and take notes by hand, particularly for last minute studying before a test. I have the HP Envy, and it’s wireless, and does the job.

A water bottle. I’m the first to admit I’m the worst at staying hydrated. At work I use one of the large Tervis tumblers to keep my drinks cold or a good Yeti cup. I love this water bottle that helps to remind you to drink frequently by glowing to help increase water intake.

Amazon Prime. Having 2-day shipping was a lifesaver during PA school and clinical year. When my feet and back were so sore during my surgery rotation, I was able to get some compression socks and better shoes on the way ASAP because by the time I got off work nothing was open and I just wanted to sleep.

For Clinic

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If you’re in the market for a new stethoscope, and want one that functions excellently and looks sharp, check out the ERKA stethoscopes from Medelita. I don’t use a stethoscope frequently in dermatology, but my husband has claimed by ERKA as his own and uses it daily at the hospital. There are plenty of color options, and the tubing holds up nicely even with frequent use.

For a coffee drinker, Medthusiast has amazing ceramic coffee mugs with gorgeous artwork on them. These mugs will be the envy of everyone else in the office!

For CME

While I wouldn’t recommend booking a full CME trip for someone else, travel essentials are always a great gift. After going to a few conferences this year, I’ve realized I don’t have great luggage or carry-ons, so those are at the top of my list this Christmas.

Lecture halls at conferences are always freezing for some reason. While I dress business casual and professional when I go to CME events, I’ve been carrying my Medelita Ionic scrub jacket with me to keep me warm. It’s a great weight and still looks professional, so I’ll just leave it at my seat in between sessions. Mine is embroidered so I don’t worry about it going missing. These are available for men and women, and they fit true to size. This is also my husband’s favorite jacket to wear at the hospital, even more than his white coat. (And don’t tell, but even all of the non-medical people in my family are getting these jackets this year!)

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At conference, I always take a good size purse or bookbag to lectures, and I have my trusty Lilly Pulitzer notebook and a ton of pens. You could create a little conference survival kit and that would be an awesome present. Don’t forget the candy and snacks!

For Fun

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Makeup and skincare are always a nice present because who doesn’t love a little pampering. Put together a basket with some bath bombs, sunscreen, and skincare kit for someone who needs to relax a little bit. I’m the first to admit that I’m a product junkie, but most recently, I’ve been using the FRÉ Skincare line. Being a dermatology PA, I’m very picky about products, but these are easy to use, gentle, and leave my skin feeling fresh. The choices aren’t overwhelming and I love that I only have to leave the Detox mask on for a few minutes. You can use the code SAVANNA1 for 15% off, and make sure you’re following me on social media for extra deals (and there’s a really good one coming for Black Friday!)

For more of my recommendations and favorites, check out my Amazon list.

80 Study Tips for PA School

A while back on Instagram, I asked for your best study tips, and you guys delivered. I compiled them into a list so if you're feeling stuck, unmotivated, or just need a new study idea to get the juices flowing you'll be able to refer back and find some inspiration. These are great study tips no matter if you are in undergrad or PA school. If you have another study tip to add, comment below to share with others! You may find some Amazon affiliate links in these tips!

  1. Study in groups

  2. Draw out material and make diagrams to visualize it

  3. Rewrite notes on material you don’t understand

  4. White boards!

  5. Use colorful highlighters and pens

  6. Quizlet

  7. Study in the morning

  8. Study after a workout to help clear your head

  9. Study alone first

  10. Make up mnemonics for material retention

  11. Study in a library

  12. Start studying before the night before the test

  13. Make flashcards

  14. Choose a location with no distractions

  15. Talk concepts out

  16. Make visual study guides with colors and pictures

  17. Find videos on YouTube to explain things differently

  18. Highlight your notes for important buzzwords

  19. Take turns teaching the material to someone else

  20. When you feel distracted write down what is distracting your mind on a piece of paper and then come back to it later

  21. Write the material over and over

  22. Practice taking exams in a setting that is similar to your actual testing environment

  23. Take a break when you feel burnt out

  24. Share your resources with your study group and see what they use

  25. If you can’t get motivated, just start and then you’ll get momentum to keep going

  26. Change up your environment to freshen your mind and keep from getting stale

  27. Unplug from all distractions = phone off

  28. Tell your friends and family the periods of time when you’ll be busy studying

  29. Limit your time on social media to designated break times

  30. Use “Focus Keeper” app on your phone or laptop to track your study session and tell you when it’s time for a break

  31. Evaluate whether studying in groups is the best option for you

  32. Snacks!

  33. Find a quiet location

  34. Take breaks every 20 minutes or so

  35. Make a chart so you can compare similar topics

  36. Use different color post-its to keep track of what you understand and what you need to review more

  37. Block time in your planner for studying

  38. Make sure you get good sleep

  39. Eat healthy

  40. Teach the material - even if it’s to an empty room

  41. Use friends to keep you accountable

  42. Record lectures and listen to them again

  43. Review the material each night to keep up the workload

  44. Focus on the material that you don’t know instead of covering what you’re familiar with

  45. Go on a walk to exercise and think through the material

  46. Listen to classical music

  47. Make a summary sheet of the main topics

  48. Listen to podcasts

  49. Use the Pomodoro technique - set a timer and divide your work into intervals with small breaks in between

  50. Make a last minute review sheet for the morning of the test to have a quick review

  51. Study for a shorter amount of time, but more often

  52. Actually pay attention in class instead of having to try to learn it afterwards

  53. Keep snacks and drinks nearby

  54. Drink lots of water

  55. Drink a specific drink or chew a specific gum when studying and do the same thing before the exam to help you recall the material more effectively

  56. Coffee!

  57. Use Google Excel to keep track of important facts

  58. Go over practice questions to practice applying your knowledge

  59. Quiz each other

  60. Take a nap if you are feeling tired

  61. Make up your own questions as you study

  62. Study at a stand up desk

  63. Take mental health breaks

  64. Buy cute study supplies so you want to use them

  65. Remember why you’re studying. What’s the end goal?

  66. Get rid of the computer or internet if it’s distracting you too much

  67. Read about the topic before going to the class or lecture

  68. Figure out your study methods and stick to them

  69. If you’re bilingual, try to think about the material in another language and translate it so you are studying it twice

  70. Use flash card apps if you don’t want to use index cards

  71. Don’t give up!

  72. If all else fails, cram.

  73. Put candy on your notes so when you make it to the next section, you get a treat

  74. Have confidence in yourself and your study skills

  75. Go study outside to get some fresh air

  76. Use Google docs to collaborate with others to make a study guide

  77. Don’t study where you sleep

  78. Link a difficult concept with an interesting story or life event

  79. Use ear plugs

  80. Don’t forget that you got this!


Advice From Current PA Students - From White Coat Dreaming

I recently connected with Alex on Instagram (@whitecoatdreaming), and she introduced me to her awesome PA blog - White Coat Dreaming. Apart from sharing her own awesome advice, Alex has also interviewed her fellow classmates in PA school to get their advice as well.  In this post, I'm going to share some of the best points to help you succeed in PA school! If you want to see more, make sure you head over to her blog to see the interviews in their entirety. 


Interview Tips:

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I think that schools like to see that you have other interests besides medicine and that you make time for the things you care about.  - Megan

I would really recommend going on a mission trip before PA school starts because it gives you an opportunity to learn more about the medical field and prepares you for PA school. Not to mention, it shows the interview committee that you are well rounded and more than just your grades. -Norin

Career change?  Be totally honest with yourself about who you are deep down, what you like, what all of your motivations are, whether you could get what it is you think you’re looking for while staying in your current spot or with a less drastic change. -Craig

The number one tip I can give you is to just be yourself! And I know that probably sounds super cliché, but it’s so true. Don’t try to be someone you’re not. Don’t try to put on an act, or memorize all the right answers to ace an interview or personal statement.
— Giftson from White Coat Dreaming

I didn’t do anything to practice so I just showed up thinking I could charm some people. And then they were tough and I bawled in my car after 2 or 3 of them. - Megan

I would truly recommend helping out the community as much as you can. During interviews, they look at more than just your grades. They want to see that you are a caring individual that does more than just study.  -Norin

There is a lot of competition for spots in PA school for good reasons, you’ve got to show that you are the cream of the crop and are a good bet for the school in terms of being able to one day be a skillful, practicing PA. -Craig 

It is so easy to compare to others and feel like you fall short, but it is so not true. We are all worth so much more than how we perform or measure up to the world’s standards. Finding my worth in Christ and knowing that He loves me no matter how small I feel was the biggest game changer. -Michelle


Applying Tips: 

Don’t get discouraged if you are waitlisted! I know plenty of people who were waitlisted and got in as late as April. -Megan

I took a year off before starting PA school because there were still some pre-requisites that I needed to complete and volunteer hours that I needed to add into my application. This really helped me focus on my application and make it stronger. -Norin

While getting into school and becoming a PA might seem like the most important thing in your life right now, don’t fall into the belief that whether you become a PA or not determines your value. You are so much more than your career! Work hard, but rest in the idea that you are going to end up exactly where you are meant to be. You are no more valuable as a PA or less valuable as something else! -Jill

Find yourself a good group of friends who will provide you with love, tissues and wine nights. They will be your backbone throughout the ‘process.’ - Alexa

People are afraid to major in something non traditional (like English, Poli Sci or philosophy), but I think it’s best to follow your own passions and interests. That will show that you are true to yourself, and are not just trying to do what you think you are ‘supposed’ to do.
— Erica from White Coat Dreaming

For me the hardest thing about applying was the cost.  - Erica

I’ve tried to make the best out of every situation. I know right now school is kind of rough, and you have to give up a lot of things that you used to have, but in the end it’ll all be worth it. -Giftson

 It is good to always have a plan B after you apply and focus on areas that you need to work on before you know if you got in that cycle or not! -Norin

The hardest part of applying was sorting through all the various requirements and prerequisites for each program. -Jill

Also, I would recommend a strong personal statement. It summarizes who you are as a person and your purpose for wanting to pursue medicine. Every part of the application is important, however, the personal statements gives them insight into your life so make sure it is strong. -Norin

I feel like location was a big factor in my decision. I knew I wanted to be in an area where I could still be around family, and having a support group nearby definitely influenced that decision but I also was excited to be out of my comfort zone. -Giftson

When the competition is so steep, you want to have as good of chances as you can, and applying to multiple programs is one way to do that! - Jill


PA School Tips: 

Know what you are getting into before you come to PA school. I was not mentally prepared for the amount of dedication that it would take to be a PA student, and it took me about 2-3 months to truly grasp how much my life was going to revolve around studying. - Erica

If your heart is not in it and this is not something you truly want to do, then stop yourself before it gets too late. PA school is hard, and honestly the pressures of the program is going to take a huge toll on you…physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. If you’re not doing it for yourself, then you’re going to crack under pressure. - Giftson

Once you get accepted, stop trying to ‘better yourself’ academically or otherwise– and just relax and enjoy yourself, as much as logistically and financially possible. If you can take a vacation beforehand or some time off, definitely do- you will be so glad later. - Erica

PA school ends up taking all of your time, so you don’t really get a chance to think about how much time you’re not spending with family and friends.  -Giftson

I faced some of my darkest moments in PA school, because, surprise…it’s hard.  And the thing that kept me going above all else was having compassion for where these long nights of studying would take me.
— Silas from White Coat Dreaming

It helped to have a running schedule that I would try my best to stick to. That forced me to workout most days after class even when I didn’t feel like it. -Michelle

Being professional and acting in a way that shows respect to others is honestly far more important than the number of years you have under your belt. I was always worried that patients or even other classmates wouldn’t take me seriously because I was so young, but over time I’ve learned not to worry about things I can’t change. -Giftson

Also, make efforts to stay balanced while in school. So many people seem to put everything aside for their grades- mental health, relationships, exercise, sleep– but those things are necessary to be successful. -Erica

We all are starting at different parts of our life, and just because you don’t have experience doesn’t mean you can’t do well. You have to understand your limitations, and strive to push those limits every day! You’re going to make mistakes. Learn from them, and keep pushing forward so you can be the best PA you can be! -Giftson

I realized when I ate healthy, it definitely helped my energy level and helped me focus better and not get so tired studying. -Michelle

Self-doubt was a huge problem for me. I would always see other people that knew so much, and wonder if I would ever get there (still haven’t got there by the way). -Giftson

Sometimes it can be challenging when you compare and think how far ahead your kiddo classmates are in terms of being about to start their career when you would have still been waking up at noon on a Wednesday to go do a half-shift of bagging liquor- but hey, whatever path you take, you are bound to have learned something that someone on another path hasn’t. - Craig

You learn quickly that your classmates are in the trenches there with you, and you depend on each other far more than for just explaining a concept you didn’t understand in lecture.  -Silas

How I Paid Off my PA School Debt

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So have you heard that PA school is expensive?  Well, that might be an understatement.  Any graduate program is going to be a little pricey, but medical programs tend to be on the higher end of things.  If you look at estimated costs for PA school, you'll see a broad range from 5-digits all the way to hundreds of thousands of dollars.  That's a lot of zeros.  And you have to look at tuition + fees + books and other resources + tools + traveling for clinicals + housing + food + everything else!

Thankfully, I went to a public program so that initially cut my costs.  My second choice school would have cost 4x as much as my program cost.  Unfortunately, that's the norm.  I had a few other advantages that helped me to cut back on the amount of loans I had.  Which brings me to Tip #1 - Take the minimum amount of loans possible!  I was able to live with my parents for the first year, and although they couldn't cover all of my expenses, they covered my fees.  I only had to take out loans to cover my tuition.  I also went to a public program, and that decreased costs significantly.  Tip #2 - Don't take out extra money to put into savings.   The amount of return you get in savings is so much less than the amount you're being charged in interest, so it's just not a smart financial move.  

I took out federal loans though Sallie Mae, which is now Navient.  I made an interesting, somewhat subconscious, decision to not ever look at how much I owed until the end of PA school when they make you do financial literacy training.  I guess I figured that it wouldn't make any difference since I wasn't able to start paying them off yet anyways.  And although I was not able to do this, here's Tip #3 - If there's any way that you can make payments during PA school, do it.  (Even if it's a small amount.)  If you get any extra income, have a spouse who works, or have savings you're sitting on, think about putting some of it towards your loans.  Those small payments make a big difference in the long run, especially with high interest rates.  

So anyways, when I pulled up my loan summary, I owed around $75,000, and that was shocking to me.  Now I know that PA school costs a lot more for a lot of people, but you can't deny that 75K is a big chunk of money.  I mean, that's the average starting salary for a new grad PA.  About 55K was principal (meaning that I had actually borrowed that much), and the other 20K was interest (the fee for the money I borrowed).  My interest rates were varied, but averaged at about 6%.  

After you graduate, there's a grace period where you are not required to make payments on your loans.  Tip #4 - If possible, start making payments during your grace period.  While you don't have to make payments, your interest is compounding and growing.  From day 1 of getting a paycheck, it helps if you start making payments right away.  You won't miss the money if you already have it dedicated to your loans.  I committed to this at first, but then I got a little lazy.  My original goal was to put at least 1/2 of my salary each month towards my loans.  But then I got the great idea that I would just put whatever was left over at the end of the month towards them.  Just kidding.  Not a great idea.  That only lasted about 2 months before I got myself back in check.  After working so hard for 2 years in school with no compensation, it can be easy to go a little crazy.  I would love to tell you to make a budget and stick with it, but I'm personally terrible at budgets, so I can't give you much advice in that area.  

So I went back to committing at least half of my salary to go straight towards my debt.  Tip #5 - Decide how much you want to put towards loans each month, and do it.  As you see the amount you owe decrease, it's so reassuring.  There are differing views on what loans to pay off first.  Dave Ramsey has the "Snowball" plan, meaning you pay the one you owe the least on, without regard to the interest percentage, and go from there to gain momentum.  I paid off the one with the highest interest rate first, and then worked my way down.  If you do automatic payments, you may get a decrease in the interest amount.  

After you've put your committed amount towards loans, if you have any extra money coming in, consider putting it towards your loans.  Tip #6 - Try to put extra funds towards your loans.   Every little bit makes a big difference.  It may not seem like it at the time, but I don't think I would have paid off my loans as quickly as I did if I hadn't done that.  And I can think of specific purchases that I made that delayed my final payment, and they probably could have waited.  

So back to my loans.  After I found out how much I owed, I committed to paying half of my salary each month to my loans, and any bonuses I got.  There were a few hiccups along the way, but I got better at it with time.  I tried to put any extra funds to my loans.  I started working in August 2014, and this past January 2016 I made my last loan payment!  It felt awesome.  Took my entire bonus/commission, and drained our bank account, but it was worth it.  I feel like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders, and I have a lot more freedom at this point.  Instead of going to the beach a few hours away, I can afford the trip to the DR without feeling guilty for not paying towards my loans.  Tip #7 - Make frugal choices while paying your loans, not extravagant ones.  

Everyone is different, and I'm sure not everyone will agree with how I did things.  But that's ok, and I'm extremely happy with where I'm at.  Debt-free, and able to start saving more and making good financial decisions.  Tip #8 - Do what works for you.  I'm a generally frugal person anyways, but I can splurge on something like a vacation or good meal.  Making big purchases, like furniture, are a lot more fun now too.  

At the end of the day, whether you're still in undergrad or worried about affording PA school, your loans will be paid off at some point.  It may not be as soon as you would like, and you'll probably make some mistakes, but it will happen!  If you have any other tips for others about paying off loans, please comment!  Or if you've paid off you're loans, I would love to share your story and help others to have confidence that it is possible!  

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1 Year Out

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I just recently realized that I've officially been a graduate for 1 full year, and it was about this time last year where I was nervously awaiting PANCE results.  It's been somewhat of a whirlwind year, and I wanted to reflect and share some advice to you guys as I look back.  It's amazing how time flies in PA school, and then it still goes as fast when you're busy working.  I went to a pharmaceutical dinner last night for PAs, and some of my past professors, and now colleagues, were there.  It was so funny because one of the teachers couldn't even remember when I graduated!  And she wanted me to call her by her first name, which just still seems weird to me.  It's amazing what a difference a year can make.  

This time last year, I had officially graduated, taken PANCE, and was training at my dermatology job.  I was almost as nervous to check my board results as I was to actually take the test.  I was at work that day and as soon as I got the e-mail that scores were posted, I went outside of the building to check them.  I had pretty much decided that if I failed, I would just leave and not go back.  Luckily, I didn't have to do that, but passing boards is what made it feel real, like I had finally made it.  I'm dreading retaking them in 10 years, but I just won't think about that for now.  

Some advice to Pre-PA students - Being a PA is a great job, and I definitely recommend it, but look at all of your options closely and decide why being a PA will be a good job for you personally.  Although in many fields, you do most of what the physician does, PAs are not physicians, and some people will never be happy in that role.  It takes hard work to become a PA and you have to decide that it's worth it you.  While you're doing all of the prerequisites for PA school, have some fun.  Looking back, I had a great college experience, but I was almost too goal focused and I do wish I was a little more laid back at times.  The stress and tears weren't really worth it.  

Advice to current PA students - Eventually, you will be done with classes and rotations and boards and you will be a PA too!  It does end, so just remember that during the weeks that you think you might just not make it.   There are still about 2 weeks that I remember as just being terrible, but we all made it through.  I would encourage you to still take care of yourself and your passions.  It can be easy to lose those things when you're so microfocused on school all the time.  I don't think I read a single book for fun while I was in PA school, instead I would read study material until I fell asleep.  Was that necessary?  Probably not.  Also take time to invest in your friendships and family.  The first 2 semesters of PA school, I wouldn't even go out to eat with my family because I "had to study."  Looking back, it would have taken probably 30 min- 1 hour, given my brain a rest, and given me nourishment and fellowship.  Maybe I got 1 point higher on the test by skipping dinner?  But I think I would have rather gone to dinner.  So don't be so uptight that you let things slip away.  Become friends with your classmates too, and hang out with them outside of school!  Some of my best friends are girls I met in PA school, and most of the things we did were unplanned and random, but just what we needed to survive.  Like buying last minute floor seats to see Taylor Swift 2 days before the show, with multiple tests the next week...maybe not the best plan, but exactly what we needed at the time.  (And it was so worth it.)  One last thing, you will find a job.  So no need to cry over that like I did either.  Your first job probably will not be your last job, but there are plenty to go around.  While job searching, I would recommend not discussing specifics of jobs with your friends or close classmates because it can get a little uncomfortable if you and your best friend are interviewing for the same job.  So just make a plan to hold off until you've signed the contract.  

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Advice to new grads - Congrats, you made it!  Welcome to the real world!  Vacation is something different now, and if you're working in a clinic with a set schedule, be prepared to ask off months in advance because they really don't like having to move 20-30 patients when you decide you're ready to go to the beach. Be wise with your money.  I had a great plan right out of school that I would just buy whatever I want and then whatever was left would go to my student loans.  Yeah, that's  a terrible plan.  Look into paying off your loans early and investing as soon as possible.  (A great resource - White Coat Investor).  While being wise with your money, don't be afraid to have some fun too.  You've deserved it!  Like if you want to plan a random trip to Las Vegas with your spouse or buddies, do it!  And keep up with your classmates.  It takes a family to get through PA school, and now that you have a bunch of new colleagues, use those resources to make each other better PAs.  If you hate your current job, look for a new one.  I once heard that you should never stop looking for a job, and there are tons out there so don't stay somewhere that you are unhappy.  Don't forget to give back to your program either, and not necessarily financially.  If you are able to lecture or be a preceptor for students, that's a huge help to the program and even more to the students.  

Overall, I'm extremely happy with my decision to become a PA and I love my job.  There are still some days when I feel overly stressed and exhausted, but there are far less than when I first started working.  I'm excited to see where our profession is heading, and how it will change and evolve.  I'm still figuring everything out, but it's getting much easier.  And I'm just happy to not be studying for the PANCE right now.  


Resources for Anatomy

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Anatomy and Physiology is not only required to get into PA school, but will be one of the courses you'll have to require while in the program, usually near the beginning.  The A&P of PA school is a whole different level from most undergraduate programs, in both amount of material and intensity.  My program was done over the summer.  We had lecture 4 days a week and then switched off lab time each day so 2 days were spent in the cadaver lab.  The experience was great, but that's a smell I don't wish to revisit.  It's still hard for me to wrap my head around the way all of the structures of the body function together, and that I actually have all of those muscles and nerves!  We had 3 tests during that first challenging course, which I achieved a C, then a B, then an A.  Progress is great, but I wish I knew which tools were going to be the most beneficial for my limited study time.  Below are the resources I used outside of our required textbook, and I hope you will find them helpful!  I've included links to the most updated sources, but for most of these the previous editions will likely be sufficient (and cheaper).  Comment below with any other books or websites you've used during anatomy. This post contains some Amazon affiliate links. 

Netter's -  This is one of the classic resources.  It's an atlas of drawings of every single part of the body.  This is an essential book for learning the structures, and if you are able to know these pictures when it comes to practical time you should be prepared.  I had a copy I kept at home and then my lab group had one as well to keep in the lab (this one gets a little messy).  These are hand-drawn pictures by the way!

Color Atlas -  This book is also a collection of pictures of anatomy, but it's actual pictures of cadavers.  If you have a real cadaver lab, this book is invaluable.  It makes it much easier to identify the structures when you know what colors they actually appear, instead of blue, green, purple, and yellow.  I preferred studying from this book once I figured out what I was doing.

Netter's Flashcards -  There are flashcards of essential structures that have Netter's drawings and all of the important material on the back.  I didn't know these existed until my husband went through medical school, and they are pretty awesome.  He used them a ton.

Thieme Atlas - This is another atlas set that actually has little blurbs of information as well instead of just pictures.  Here is a link to the book on Google Books.  There are a few pages missing, but most of the content is there if you want to check it out!

University of Michigan Practice Questions -  These questions are amazing!  There are also practical identification questions.  I didn't do these for the first test and I truly regret it.  They are vignette style questions on high-yield material and give explanations for why an answer is wrong.  Great, free practice!

Lippincott's Illustrated Q&A of Anatomy and Embryology -  Lippincott has a great series of Q&A books, and this one may be the first one you use.  It has explanations for why answers are right or wrong, and these are also vignette-style.

Netter's App -  If you're more advanced technologically, you will love this app.  You can choose which structures you want to view and quiz yourself on different parts of the body.  It's a 3-D view and my husband still uses this to study.

Zygote Body -  This is similar to the Netter's app, but available on the internet.  There are different levels you can subscribe to, but sometimes it helps to get a different view and be able to customize quizzes.


Respecting Patients

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There has been a lot of press about a news story that came out recently.  Basically, during a routine colonoscopy, the patient accidentally had his phone recording, and happened to hear some very insulting remarks being made by the anesthesiologist during his procedure.  The things that were said were pretty outrageous, but unfortunately it is not too uncommon in many medical settings to hear negative comments about patients at times.  There were many things wrong with this case, including that the physician was making inappropriate comments, no one tried to protect the patient, and the physician made comments about billing for diagnoses that weren't present.

This case is a good reminder that it is our job as healthcare providers to protect our patients, and not just because you could lose money over it.  Working in the medical field day after day can be exhausting and sometimes it is easier to complain and rant then to just keep the frustrations in.  Whether it's the late patient, the difficult patient, or a drug seeker, it is not our job to judge the person who comes to us for help.  Even if you're not the initiator, you can help to be a positive influence in your workplace.

A story like this gives medical providers a bad wrap, and makes patients even more skeptical about whether we are really there to help them.  Especially if a patient is going under for a procedure, there's a good chance they are nervous about it, and the focus needs to be on "doing no harm" at all times, even when it's hard.  I hope you keep this in mind when you are out in clinic or hospitals and let's be more aware of how we are treating our patients.